Sclerotherapy

“Sclerotherapy” comes from the Greek words sklerosis (a hardening of tissue) and therapeia (restorative treatment).  The term refers to a treatment for venous disease that involves the injection of a medical agent into the afflicted veins.  The substance hardens the veins and closes it off to be reabsorbed into the body.  

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The procedure as it stands today is a simple one.  Sclerotherapy is non-invasive, and can be finished in about ten minutes.  Recovery times are quick. The majority of patients are back at their usual routine within a week of the procedure, with minimal pain and complications.  It should be rather perfected at this point.  It has been tinkered on and experimented with for the centuries.

Varicose veins have been recorded since over 1500 years before the common era.  Probably the earliest recorded precursor to modern day sclerotherapy is from 460 B.C.E. when Hippocrates documented a form of thrombosis to treat venal disease by inserting an iron rod into the vein. 

Physician Sigismund Eisholtz performed the first injection of distilled plantain water into the crural vein in the mid 17th century.  In the earliest days of the procedure, a variety of compounds were utilized in venous treatment, including mercury, iodine, and ferric chloride.  Modern day sclerosant drugs such as polidocanol and sodium tetradecyl sulfate are usually injected in the form of a foam.

Even early venous physicians recognized the usefulness of compression therapy as a side aide to venous treatment.  Plaster bandages, leather straps, and the like were the precursor to the modern day compression stockings that patients wear post operation.  These greatly help the healing process, and to prevent the problem from recurring.

Sclerotherapy has changed a lot since its inception, but it is still largely used for the same reasons.  The unsightly and unpleasant feel of venous disease is a hardship to many.  Sclerotherapy is a useful, quick, and easy solution to a lot of those problems.

At the Vein & Vascular Center in Jackson, TN, we specialize in providing the most up-to-date, professional vascular care. Our office is located at 395 Hospital Blvd, Jackson , TN.  Call us at 731-664-7395, or find us on the web at www.vvcjackson.com where you can learn more about our team and services.