Are you aware?

"Compression socks or stockings can be found on the legs of a wide swath of the population, from pilots, flight attendants, runners, and nurses to pregnant women, people recovering from surgery, and people otherwise at risk for blood clots in their legs. Just as varied as the people wearing them are the stockings’ materials and prices, with a pair selling anywhere from $10 to well over $100. Outside of medical uses, can the average person benefit from wearing compression stockings? Are there risks to wearing them? What do the pressure ratings on the packages mean? Here, a quick guide to this sometimes confusing category of products.

Who should wear compression stockings?

The clearest benefit is for people with certain leg problems or at risk for blood clots in the legs, known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Many factors can increase the risk of these clots, including prolonged bed rest (such as after surgery), sitting for long periods (such as on a plane), use of birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, pregnancy, family history of DVT, inflammatory bowel disease, and certain genetic clotting disorders. Compression stockings are also sometimes used in people who have an acute DVT, to prevent a group of symptoms known as post-thrombotic syndrome that includes leg pain and swelling. But the American College of Chest Physicians says there’s insufficient evidence to support using the stockings for this purpose."

To continue reading, please click on the link below!

http://www.berkeleywellness.com/self-care/over-counter-products/article/rough-guide-compression-stockings

Saphenous Vein Ablation

"Venous insufficiency resulting from superficial reflux because of varicose veins is a serious problem that usually progresses inexorably if left untreated. When the refluxing circuit involves failure of the primary valves at the saphenofemoral junction, treatment options for the patient are limited, and early recurrences are the rule rather than the exception.

In the historical surgical approach, ligation and division of the saphenous trunk and all proximal tributaries are followed either by stripping of the vein or by avulsion phlebectomy. Proximal ligation requires a substantial incision at the groin crease. Stripping of the vein requires additional incisions at the knee or below and is associated with a high incidence of minor surgical complications. Avulsion phlebectomy requires multiple 2- to 3-mm incisions along the course of the vein and can cause damage to adjacent nerves and lymphatic vessels.

Endovenous ablation has replaced stripping and ligation as the technique for elimination of saphenous vein reflux. One of the endovenous techniques is a radiofrequency-based procedure. Newer methods of delivery of radiofrequency were introduced in 2007. Endovenous procedures are far less invasive than surgery and have lower complication rates. The procedure is well tolerated by patients, and it produces good cosmetic results. Excellent clinical results are seen at 4-5 years, and the long-term efficacy of the procedure is now known with 10 years of experience. The original radiofrequency endovenous procedure was cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in March 1999."

To continue reading, please click on the link below! 

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1085800-overview

The Know!

"Varicose veins are most often swollen, gnarled veins that most frequently occur in the legs, ankles and feet. They are produced by a condition known as venous insufficiency or venous reflux, in which blood circulating through the lower limbs does not properly return to the heart but instead pools up in the distended veins.

More than 25 million Americans suffer from venous reflux disease. The symptoms can include pain and fatigue in the legs, swollen ankles and calves, burning or itching skin, skin discoloration and leg ulcers. In less severe cases, thin, discolored vessels – “spider veins” – may be the only symptom.

Gender and age are two primary risk factors in the development of venous reflux. An estimated 72% of American women and 42% of men will experience varicose veins symptoms by the time they reach their sixties. Women who have been pregnant more than once and people who are obese, have a family history of varicose veins or spend a great deal of time standing have an elevated risk for the condition, but it can occur in almost anyone at almost any age. Varicose veins never go away without treatment and frequently progress and worsen over time.

Severe varicose veins can have a significant impact on the lives of people who work on their feet – nurses, teachers, flight attendants et al. Research has shown that more than two million workdays are lost each year in the US, and annual expenditures for treatment total $1.4 billion."

Please visit our website for more information!

DVT Prevention!

"The key to prevention of DVT is to reverse any risk factors, for example:

  • Lose weight if overweight or obese.
  • Avoid periods of prolonged immobility. Get up and move around every 15 to 30 minutes during long plane flights. Do simple stretching exercises while seated. Make frequent stops and get out of the car when driving long distances.
  • Keep the legs elevated while sitting down or in bed.
  • Avoid high-dose estrogen pills, unless they are deemed necessary by the doctor.

In the case of recent surgery, preventive treatment may be prescribed to avoid formation of a clot.

  • The patient may be instructed to get out of bed several times a day during the recovery period.
  • Sequential compression devices (SCDs) may be placed on the legs. Their squeezing action has been shown to reduce the probability of clot formation. The patient may also be given elastic compression socks or stockings to wear.
  • Low-molecular-weight heparin or low-dose warfarin may be prescribed to prevent clot formation.

 

What is the prognosis for a person with DVT (deep vein thrombosis)?

 

Most DVTs resolve on their own. If a pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs, the prognosis can be more severe.

  • About 25% of people who have a PE will die suddenly, and that will be the only symptom.
  • About 23% of people with PE will die within 3 months of diagnosis, just over 30% will die after 6 months, and there is a 37% mortality (death) rate at 1 year after being diagnosed."

To continue reading, please click on the link listed below!

http://www.emedicinehealth.com/blood_clot_in_the_legs/page6_em.htm#how_can_dvt_deep_vein_thrombosis_be_prevented

Testimonials!

"

I was quite relaxed and no pain. Afterwards I went home and I was allowed to walk around and do little things. After three days, I was back to my full routine. Bev J

I have so much more energy now. This [Closure Procedure] literally changed my life. Cara M

No pain whatsoever. If I'd had known it was this easy, I probably would have come a lot sooner. Patty D

It was quick, painless and instant results. Instant pain relief, It's kind of miraculous. Christine R

I feel great. I can do things without my legs getting tired. I could have went right from here to work. Darlene B

I came in on a Friday, and by Sunday, I was standing at my kitchen sink, and I could feel the difference in the leg that had had the procedure and the leg that had not. Audra T

I'm excited to be able to not live with the pain and the heaviness in my legs and get back to some normal activities. Grace B"

For more, please click on the link listed below!

https://www.vvcjackson.com/testimonials-1/

Understanding is Key!

"Leg veins carry blood from your feet and legs back to your heart. If a vein is damaged, it may cause problems in your legs."

The problems that may happen from damage to the veins include:

  • Varicose veins. This a swollen, twisted vein located close to the skin.
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). This is a blood clot in one of the deep veins, usually of the legs. The clot can separate from the vein and travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism or PE). In the lungs, the clot can cut off the flow of blood. These two conditions together are called venous thromboembolism (VTE).
  • Chronic venous insufficiency. This is a long-term problem with the veins not working well.

Your healthcare provider can give you more information on these conditions and how to prevent and treat them."

For more information, please click on the link below! 

https://www.mountnittany.org/articles/healthsheets/6860

Home Remedies!

"Varicose veins are twisted and enlarged veins, usually found on legs. Excessive pressure on the veins, especially when standing and sitting, is the main reason for the enlargement of these superficial veins, but heredity also seems to have a major role.

Since legs are the farthest extremity from the heart, it requires extra effort to pump the blood up the veins in the leg and back into the heart against gravity. This is done by the calf muscles. There are paired valves in these veins to prevent backflow of the blood, but as the veins lose their elasticity and become dilated, these valves fail. This results in blood getting pooled in the veins, causing them to twist and bulge out.

Varicose veins are seen more often in women and in people who have to work in a standing position for long hours. Pregnancy and obesity worsen the condition since they put extra strain on the legs. Unless accompanied by pain, severe itching, ulceration, or eczema, varicose veins are often considered merely a cosmetic problem. Occasionally it could be associated with another serious condition called deep vein thrombosis, in which case, immediate medical intervention may be necessary."

 

Please consult a doctor before trying any home remedies! Click the link below to read more!

http://www.naturallivingideas.com/16-home-remedies-varicose-veins-really-work/

Great Saphenous Vein

"The great saphenous vein is the major superficial vein of the medial leg and thigh. It is the longest vein in the human body, extending from the top of the foot to the upper thigh and groin. The great saphenous vein plays an important role in returning blood from the superficial tissues of the leg to the heart and is also used in several medical procedures due to its size and superficial location.

The great saphenous vein is a superficial vein that runs through the subcutaneous tissue layer deep to the dermis and superficial to the skeletal muscles of the foot and leg.

It begins at the dorsal venous arch of the foot, a major superficial vein that drains blood from the toes and back of the foot. From the dorsal venous arch, the great saphenous vein passes anterior to the medial malleolus of the ankle and enters the medial side of the leg. As it ascends through the leg, it merges with many superficial veins of the leg before passing over the medial epicondyle of the femur at the knee and entering the thigh. Continuing through the thigh, the great saphenous vein turns anteriorly while merging with several more superficial veins. At the top of the thigh, it passes through the saphenous opening of the fascia lata and enters the deeper tissues of the upper thigh before merging into the femoral vein."

To continue reading this article, please click on the link listed below!

http://www.innerbody.com/image_cardov/card29-new.html

Telangiectasia

"Varicose veins and telangiectasia (spider veins) are the visible surface manifestations of an underlying problem with reverse venous flow, which is also termed venous insufficiency syndrome. Mild forms of venous insufficiency are merely uncomfortable, annoying, or cosmetically disfiguring, but severe venous disease can produce serious systemic consequences and can lead to loss of life or limb. See the image below."

 

To continue reading the article, please click on the link listed below! 

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1085530-overview

Deep Venous Thrombosis

"Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a manifestation of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Although most DVT is occult and resolves spontaneously without complication, death from DVT-associated massive pulmonary embolism (PE) causes as many as 300,000 deaths annually in the United States."

You will be able to find more information at the following website!

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1911303-overview

Vein Replacements

"Peripheral artery disease (PAD) results from the build-up of plaque (atherosclerosis) in the arteries of the legs. For most people with PAD, symptoms may be mild or absent, and no treatment of the artery blockages is required. However as these blockages become more extensive, patients may experience pain and disability that limits their walking, and in the most advanced cases individuals may be at risk for loss of the limb unless circulation is improved. For these patients with severe PAD, attempts to improve blood flow in the leg are usually indicated. The goals of improving blood flow to the limb are to reduce pain, improve functional ability and quality of life, and to prevent amputation. "

To continue reading this article, please click on the link listed below! 

http://vascular.surgery.ucsf.edu/conditions--procedures/lower-extremity-bypass-surgery.aspx

"On June 5, Lawrence Breakley became the first patient in the U.S. to receive a new kind of artificial vein made from human cells.

A new type of blood vessel made in a laboratory may soon improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of Americans. 

While man-made veins are nothing new, a Virginia man has become the first in the U.S. to receive an implant that becomes functionally alive in animals. Dr. Jeffrey Lawson of Duke University Hospital performed the surgery June 5 on 62-year-old Lawrence Breakley. "

 

To continue reading this article, please follow the link listed below!

http://www.healthline.com/health-news/tech-virginia-man-first-to-receive-artificial-vein-implant-061113

Noninvasive Treatments!

"Varicose veins most often develop in the legs. They often stick out and are blue in color.

  • Normally, valves in your veins keep your blood flowing up toward the heart, so the blood does not collect in one place.
  • The valves in varicose veins are either damaged or missing. This causes the veins to become filled with blood, especially when you are standing.

The following treatments for varicose veins can be done in a health care provider's office or clinic. You will receive local anesthesia to numb your leg. You will be awake, but will not feel pain."

For more information on this subject, please follow the link listed below! 

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007395.htm

Compression Hose Therapy

"You wear compression stockings to improve blood flow in your legs. Compression stockings gently squeeze your legs to move blood up your legs. This helps prevent leg swelling and, to a lesser extent, blood clots.

If you have varicose veins, spider veins, or have just had surgery, your health care provider may prescribe compression stockings.

Wearing stockings helps with:

  • Aching and heavy feeling in legs
  • Swelling in legs
  • Preventing blood clots, primarily after surgery or injury when you are less active"

To continue reading this article, please follow the link listed below! 

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000597.htm

What Are The Signs?

"The signs and symptoms of varicose veins include:

  • Large veins that you can see just under the surface of your skin.
  • Mild swelling of your ankles and feet.
  • Painful, achy, or "heavy" legs.
  • Throbbing or cramping in your legs.
  • Itchy legs, especially on the lower leg and ankle. Sometimes this symptom is incorrectly diagnosed as dry skin.
  • Discolored skin in the area around the varicose vein.

Signs of telangiectasias are clusters of red veins that you can see just under the surface of your skin. These clusters usually are found on the upper body, including the face. Signs of spider veins are red or blue veins in a web or tree branch pattern. Often, these veins appear on the legs and face.

See your doctor if you have these signs and symptoms. They also may be signs of other, more serious conditions."

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/vv/signs

Deep Vein Thrombosis

"Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. It mainly affects the large veins in the lower leg and thigh, but can occur in other deep veins such as in the arms and pelvis."

Need more information? Click the link below to get caught up!

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000156.htm

What are Varicose Veins?

Education:

Varicose veins are most often swollen, gnarled veins that most frequently occur in the legs, ankles and feet. They are produced by a condition known as venous insufficiency or venous reflux, in which blood circulating through the lower limbs does not properly return to the heart but instead pools up in the distended veins.

More than 25 million Americans suffer from venous reflux disease. The symptoms can include pain and fatigue in the legs, swollen ankles and calves, burning or itching skin, skin discoloration and leg ulcers. In less severe cases, thin, discolored vessels – “spider veins” – may be the only symptom.

Gender and age are two primary risk factors in the development of venous reflux. An estimated 72% of American women and 42% of men will experience varicose veins symptoms by the time they reach their sixties. Women who have been pregnant more than once and people who are obese, have a family history of varicose veins or spend a great deal of time standing have an elevated risk for the condition, but it can occur in almost anyone at almost any age. Varicose veins never go away without treatment and frequently progress and worsen over time.

Severe varicose veins can have a significant impact on the lives of people who work on their feet – nurses, teachers, flight attendants et al. Research has shown that more than two million workdays are lost each year in the US, and annual expenditures for treatment total $1.4 billion.

Know your options for treating varicose veins

If you have painful, unattractive varicose veins, you are not alone: More than 30 million Americans, men and women alike, are affected by the condition called venous insufficiency, which includes varicose veins, spider veins, and telangiectasias. While rarely serious to your health, varicose and spider veins can affect your psychological and physical sense of well-being—from their unsightly appearance to the feelings of pain, cramping, heaviness and fatigue that failing veins can produce. In some cases, changes in the skin, and even leg ulcers, may develop.

“Venous insufficiency occurs when the vein’s valves become damaged and cannot transport blood back to the heart efficiently,” says Misaki M. Kiguchi, MD, a vascular surgeon at MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute and a specialist in the management of vein disorders. “Family history, multiple pregnancies, occupations  requiring long periods of standing, obesity and age are all contributing factors.”

Fighting against gravity, healthy veins rely upon valves to open and close tightly, keeping the blood flowing in one direction: back to the heart and lungs. When the valves cease to function as they should, some blood leaks backward and pools in the legs, straining blood vessel walls.

The result is visually swollen veins close to the skin’s surface. Unfortunately, varicose veins will not  resolve by themselves and, left untreated, may worsen over time.

Approaches to the common condition range from conservative therapy to surgical intervention.

“Compression hose, which no one likes to wear, actually work

by providing extra support and pressure,” Dr. Kiguchi says. “But it’s like wearing prescription eye glasses:  You’re not really fixing the problem—only treating the symptoms.”

Today’s improved, minimally invasive techniques cannot only relieve pain, but address the root cause of the problem and  improve appearance, safely and effectively.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), for instance, uses a needle, a small catheter and  heat to collapse varicose veins. Similarly, sclerotherapy involves using a chemical injection to close off either spider or varicose veins. For the appropriate patients, these approaches produce results that are as effective as more invasive approaches, with less pain and recovery time.

“RFA and sclerotherapy are both well tolerated,” Dr. Kiguchi concludes. “Most patients are surprised by how quick and easy the treatments are.”

And what happens to those now-destroyed blood vessels? The body eventually reabsorbs them, as other veins take over their important job:  keeping blood moving back to the heart and lungs.

 

Sclerotherapy for Varicose Veins

Treatment Overview

Sclerotherapy uses an injection of a special chemical (sclerosant) into avaricose vein to damage and scar the inside lining of the vein. This causes the vein to close.

During this procedure, the affected leg is elevated to drain blood, and the sclerosant is injected into the varicose vein. The procedure is done in a doctor's office or clinic and takes 5 to 30 minutes, depending on how many varicose veins are treated and how big they are.

After the injection of sclerosant is given, pressure is applied over the veins to prevent blood return when you stand up. You may need to wearcompression stockings for several days or weeks to maintain the pressure.

The sclerotherapy injection may be painful, and the chemical (sclerosant) that is injected can cause a feeling of burning or cramping for a few minutes in the area where the shot was given. You may need repeated sessions and many injections each session, depending on the extent of the varicose veins and type of sclerosant used.

A newer, minimally invasive technique allows your doctor to inject sclerosant with a catheter. The catheter and sclerosant are guided to the affected vein with the help of duplex ultrasound. This process allows sclerotherapy treatment to be used on larger varicose veins that previously could only be treated surgically with ligation and stripping, in which larger varicose veins are tied off and removed.

What To Expect After Treatment

Sclerotherapy generally does not require any recovery period. You will likely be able to walk immediately after the treatment, but you should take it easy for a day or two. Bed rest is not recommended, but you may need to avoid strenuous exercise for a few days after sclerotherapy. Avoid exposing your legs to the sun for the first 2 weeks after the procedure.

Why It Is Done

Sclerotherapy is used to treat:

  • Spider veins and small veins that are not causing more serious problems.
  • Smaller varicose veins that come back after vein-stripping surgery.
  • Larger varicose veins, when minimally invasive techniques are used.

Sclerotherapy may be done alone or as a follow-up to surgery.